Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Kennel Cough


It seems that an outbreak of Kennel Cough has hit the Bozeman, MT area and has dog owners (and daycares) in quite the panic. Kennel cough is often called "Bordetalla" after the bacteria Bordetalla bronciseptica, which dogs can get vaccinated. BUT Kennel Cough, aka infectious tracheobronchitis, is actually a term for an infection in the trachea and bronchial tubes that can be caused by bacteria or virus. This infection is highly contagious and has an incubation period of about 5-10 days after exposure. It usually diminishes after the first 5 days, but can linger for up to 10-20 days. Infected dogs can remain contagious for up to 14 weeks even after symptoms disappear. The classic symptom of Kennel Cough is a forceful, persistent cough. Infected dogs may also exhibit sneezing, runny nose and eye discharge.

Luckily, here at Bark City, we have not had any cases of Kennel Cough in our daycare. We would like to keep it that way! In order to try our very best, we have taken the following measures:

1) Our facility is set up with 3 different air circulation systems (one for the standard side, one for the enrichment program, and one for the training room). We will not be letting dogs from the two different programs mix (standard will just stay with standard, enrichment will stay on that side and the training room we will be using as a quarantine room for possible coughing. Since this is an air born virus hopefully this will help eliminate the possibility of it spreading.
2) If your dog coughs even just once, your dog will be pulled out and put in the training room. You will be called and asked to please pick up your dog. Boarders, if no one is available to pick up your dog, they will stay in that room (and of course given potty breaks) for at least 24hrs. If they cough more than once they will need to see a vet and will need to stay in quarantine for the remainder of their stay.
3) We do spray down and disinfect all of our yards twice a day and disinfect all indoor space daily.
4) We will be offering complementary coconut oil or goats milk to all boarders if the owners wish. These two things  help support the immune system. We also sell these products and are adding a Bone Broth mix onto our shelves if you would like to purchase and take home with you. 😊

5) We are diffusing a mixture of Canine safe essential oils that are known to help support the respiratory tract.
6) Employees will be disinfecting hands and feet if dealing with a coughing dog before handling another dog.


What you can do:
1) If your dog coughs (even just once) please keep it away from all dogs for at least 24hrs to make sure it doesn't turn into something more.
2) If your dogs develops a cough call your vet asap and follow their instructions.
3) Stay away from all dog parks and dog populated areas that you are not sure if there has been a coughing dog there or not.
4) Call and report any coughing to us or the facility your dog stayed at so they can watch the other dogs in their care.
5) Let us know if your dog stayed at another facility so we know if it has been exposed to the virus or not.
 

Please remember, boarding and daycare facilities are not the only place that your dog can get a virus (neighbor dogs, friends dogs, dog walking on the street, dog parks, pet sitters, hiking trails ect). If your dog gets sick, keep them away from all dogs for at least 10 days after the last symptom showed and contact your vet to get the official "OK" before socializing your dog with other canines. For more information, you can follow the below links:


Monday, July 3, 2017

How Much Sleep Does a Puppy Need?


So you got a new puppy and for most of the day this little fur ball is the cutest thing in the world. But during particular times of day, your little wiggly butt turns into a beast of incessant barking and biting. Let's face it, those puppy teeth HURT. So what's up with that? Chances are, your puppy is tired and overstimulated. Puppies need A LOT of sleep, and I mean A LOT. Dog's sleep more than humans (lucky them), but a puppy needs more sleep than most people think. The younger the puppy, the more sleep they will need. A newborn puppy will sleep about 22 hours a day and use the rest of it's time for things like nursing. At 3-months, your puppy will need about 15-20 hours of sleep a day. This sleep is crucial for body development. Things like: building muscle, brain development and improving the immune system. If your puppy does not get enough sleep, you get a cranky, destructive teeth chomper that is at risk for infections and illness. NOT GOOD.

The problem is that, like human toddlers, puppy toddlers don't necessarily know when they should sleep. They want to play, play, play! It's your job, as the canine parent, to teach your puppy the appropriate sleep patterns.

How To Help Puppy Sleep:
  • Create a sleep friendly environment: A dog can hear 4x's the distance of a human and has 125-300 million scent glands compared to a human's measly 5 million. Nap time for a puppy should be quiet and dark with minimal noise. This may mean having puppy in a separate room from all the other household activity. Adjusting the light and noise is critical to making sure your puppy is getting good sleep.
  • Give your puppy new experiences, but allow them to process those experiences afterward: Taking your puppy to the park or downtown is great for proper socialization skills. But again, remember that a dog's senses are much different from our own. What you may consider a mundane walk through the neighborhood is an overwhelming amount of smells and noises to your puppy. Give your puppy new experiences, but give them time to sleep and process afterward.
  • Exercise: It's always good to provide your dog with daily exercise. An under exercised dog will become frustrated and find not-so-good ways to express this frustration. But, on the flip side, an over exercised puppy will become cranky. It's the body's way of saying "Hey! I need sleep!"
  • How to Handle a Cranky Puppy: If you find yourself in a situation where your puppy is barking, biting and overall just being a little terror. Don't just toss them in the crate and call it good.  Remember, a puppy might not realize he/she is tired! You must first find a way to calm your puppy and then put them in "the sleep zone". A crate should be a positive experience and should not be used for "punishment". If you are frustrated with your over-tired little fur ball, they will sense that frustration. Tossing them in the crate while frustrated will cause them to associate their crate to a negative feeling.  
 There are times when you should worry that your puppy is getting too much sleep and something might be wrong. Puppies, like human children, will sleep more during growth spurts, but if your puppy has low energy while awake, you may want to take them to the vet. Your puppy may be anemic or have an internal parasite. Anemia can be caused by things like a flea infestation and a flea infestation can lead to internal parasites like tape worms.

For more about sleep and dogs, please visit these other posts by Bark City:

Monday, June 12, 2017

Dealing With Food Aggression


Food aggression is a form of resource guarding in which a dog becomes defensive and uses threats, like growling, to force other animals or humans away from a food source. If not dealt with, it can lead to a bigger problem of being possessive of everything-- toys, beds, treats, food, ect... But, before I begin on the steps that dog owners can take to deal with a food aggressive dog, I should lay down a common ground rule for all dogs--> Humans (including, and especially, children) should never mess with a dog while its eating. This includes the common myth of making a dog eat out of it's bowl with your hand in it.

There are three levels of food aggression:
1. Mild-- a dog will show it's teeth and growl.
2. Moderate-- a dog will snap and lunge.
3. Extreme-- a dog will attempt to, and/or maybe succeed, at biting another animal or human.

If you are a dog owner that has a dog with extreme food aggression, your best measure is to get an expert to help you with the problem. Do not try to deal with it on your own.

Food aggression can stem from a dog trying to show it's dominance in a pack (aka the alpha male) OR it can be from a stressed out, high anxiety dog. As a dog owner, the first thing you need to recognize is why your dog is being aggressive. Is your dog trying to maintain rank in the pack? If so, then you, as the dog owner, must establish yourself as the leader in a calm, assertive way. If your dog is food aggressive from stress and anxiety, then you must teach your dog that food is safe and build up your dog's confidence level. Once the reason is established, you can move forward with desensitizing and counter conditioning your dog to associate humans (or other animals) being around the food as a positive experience. 

Signs of Food Aggression :
  • Hovering over the meal-- the body will be stiff with the head down. 
  • Whites of the eyes are visible
  • Ears are back 
  • Tail is lowered
  • Hackles rise
  • Growling
  • Lunging
  • Biting
*A food aggressive dog can show any or all of these behaviors. 

Steps To Take:
  • Be Consistent With Meals: A dog should not be "free fed" with a large bowl that they eat out of at all times of the day. There should be a designated meal time(s) at the same time(s) every day and once the meal is done, the bowls should be put away. If you have more than one animal, each pet should have it's own bowl. 
  • A Dog Should Work For It's Food: While you are preparing the meal, the dog should sit and stay outside of the room and remain at "stay" while the bowl is being set down on the floor. Your dog should only be able to eat once you have given permission with a command.
  • Pack Leaders Eat First: You, the dog owner, are the pack leader. Not the dog. Therefore, your dog needs to wait until you have eaten before he/she can eat. You dog should never be eating at the same time you are eating or before you have eaten.
  • Stay With the Bowl: Instead of the dog learning they win the food when you walk away, stay near them while they eat. This teaches your dog they win the food when you stay.
Three Addition Steps To Consider: 
  1. If needed, hand feed your dog it's meal one kibble at a time like you are giving a treat. You can also use your hands to put the food into the bowl so that your scent is on the food, but never actually stick your hand in the bowl while your dog is eating. 
  2. While the dog is eating, occasionally toss a really good treat into the bowl. The treat should be something your dog absolutely loves, but only gets during meal time. He/she will start to associate you being around the bowl as being a positive experience (the really good treat).
  3. Trade up during mealtime. The goal of "trading up" is to get your dog to stop eating and take food from you (again, using the really good treat). This teaches your dog that no one will steal his food if he looks up from his bowl.  
Food aggression is something that needs to be dealt with before it gets out of hand. It is a common problem many dog owners encounter. But, can easily be dealt with and remedied with patience and positive reward.